5AM Club — My Reflections So Far

Last week, during a conversation to connect with a dear family friend, she shared about her trying the 5AM Club by Robin Sharma. I used to be a big fan of Robin Sharma, but had not thought about his stuff in a long time. She sent me a summary PDF of his work, and I was very impressed.

I have not read the book, but the premise revolves around:

  • Waking up at 5AM
  • Doing 20 minutes of movement
  • Doing 20 minutes of reflection/meditation
  • Doing 20 minutes of growth-focused activities (e.g., review goals, read, podcasts, etc.)

For me, between work and family and household care, I have felt my personal needs for time for me stretched thin. Or, as I am beginning to realize, I have never really prioritized it or it is something that has often fallen by the side.

Movement:

Since the beginning of this pandemic, I have begun to see that I genuinely don’t enjoy working out. I used to get a natural high and excitement by going for a run, but these days getting in my exercise for the day feels like a stretch. That being said, I feel the cumulative lethargy that grows with a lack of movement; and, the same for when I actually do move.

Meditate/Reflect/Journal:

I have so been wanting to simply journal, reflect or meditate. I have noticed that with Facebook, and conversations — I can lose sight of what I actually am thinking about. I try to stand guard at what I input into my brain, and generally most things are pretty good, but I just have been craving for a little time to naturally let things come up in my head. I have been meditating for 10 minutes with Insight Timer’s Sharon Salzberg’s Breathe Meditation. I have kept this consistent for 2 weeks now, and there is something easier to dropping into a consistent voice and instruction, rather than something that changes everyday. Also, I am finding guided meditation easier these days.

Growth:

I have been writing, note taking, journaling a bit more. I am trying to take notes on most articles I read — this reduces how much input I am taking in, and also helps me to get more out of what I am reading. I am also trying to simply jot down more beautiful memories with Sarika, my Mom, the kids and everyone else that I have a chance to connect with.

Week 1: Summary

For the past week, I have been working to wake up at 5AM. A couple reflections:

  • Waking up at 5AM requires you to be on point the evening before. I need to estimate out my evening closeout activities and plan accordingly. In other words, I need to at the latest be in bed by 9:15 to give myself a ramp down time.
  • I need 20 minutes of my body even remotely being ready to move before getting started. I really want/need my cup of coffee right now.
  • I need switching time between Move/Reflect/Grow, and the 20/20/20 turns into 80 minutes to adjust for switching time.
  • I can sometimes have a crash at around 8 to 9AM. I had to take a nap at 8AM once.
  • I am really tired by the evening, and may even sleep deeper.
  • I am seeing how I almost don’t care to look at my phone in the evening.

The Tyranny of Convenience

“We need to consciously embrace the inconvenient — not always, but more of the time. Nowadays individuality has come to reside in making at least some inconvenient choices. You need not churn your own butter or hunt your own meat, but if you want to be someone, you cannot allow convenience to be the value that transcends all others. Struggle is not always a problem. Sometimes struggle is a solution. It can be the solution to the question of who you are.”

~ https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/16/opinion/sunday/tyranny-convenience.html

 

 

 

“When we come close to the end of our life, what’s really important makes itself known. It isn’t whether or not we have two Mercedes or whether or not we spent more time at the office. For most people, it’s about relationships. It’s about answering two questions: ‘Am I loved?’ and ‘Did I love well?’ So much of what happens around the end of life boils down to those two questions.” —Frank Ostaseski, author of The Five Invitations: Discovering What Death Can Teach the Living